2016 Parliamentary Election

Jordan held elections for the 18th Parliament September 20, 2016. This is a brief overview of official observer comments as summarized from the EU Election Observation Mission (EOM) Report.

THE VERDICT

Though of course improvements still need to be made to the quality of the vote in Jordan, the improvements made from the 2013 to the 2016 election have been most satisfactory in voter registration, voter secrecy, legitimacy of the vote, and campaign ethics. [page 49]

As the EU EOM writes, this year’s elections were “well-administered and inclusive”. [page 6]

THE CANDIDATES

The 2016 election saw 1,252 candidates on 226 lists running for a 130 seat parliament. [page 27] That is 9.6 candidates per seat available. Of the 130 seats, there were 103 non-reserved seats, 15 seats for women, 9 seats for Christians, and 3 seats for Chechens and Circessians. [page 23]

Only 215 candidates clearly ran within a specific party. The remaining were non-party candidates. Candidates mostly fell cleanly into three distinguished sections: centrist, secular and Islamist. [page 27]

THE VOTERS

In 2016, Jordan had 4,130,145 registered voters (52.9% female and 47.1% male), which was nearly double the number of voters registered in the previous 2013 election (2.27 million). This is in part due to the decrease of the voting age and a newly implemented policy of active voter registration (instead of passive voter registration).[page 7]

The civil registry was the base for the compilation of voter lists. Voters were asked to use their unique national identification card for voting, and were required to use indelible ink on election day to enhance voter franchise and to prevent the possibility of multiple votes.[page 26]

At the end of the day, 1,492,400 votes were cast, coming in at 36.1% of registered voters. 48% of the voters this year were women and 35% of the voters were ages 17-30 years old.[page 47]

The EU EOM reported that the voting process and counting was “overall well managed”.[page 45]

THE RESULTS

The election resulted in 20 women elected, representing 15.4% of the 130 MPs. With only 15 seats reserved for women, five won non-reserved seats.[page 47]

The breakdown of winners by party is as follows:[page48]

 

Political Party Name

Candidates

Seats Claimed by Political Party

Islamic Action Front Party

50

10

The National Current Party

23

4

The Islamist Wasat Party

18

7

The National Union Party

3

7

The National Congress Party (Zamzam)

14

5

Justice and Reform Party

9

3

The Jordanian United Front Party

20

1

The National Action Front Party

2

0

The National Wafa’a Party

10

1

Al Awn Party

1

1

Al Resalah Party

1

1

The Arab Ba’ath Progressive Party

3

2

Stronger Jordan

7

0

HASHD Party

1

0

AL Wafaa Jordanian Party

10

0

 

All remaining seats went to non-party affiliated candidates. 

 

Final Election Results .

Please note that all names are kept in their original Arabic form.